Black History Matters 365

Black History Month 2021: A Reading from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Letter from A Birmingham Jail with Carl Jones, Voiceover Actor

February 25, 2021 BHM365 is a weekly podcast series hosted by Jo Scaife a Marketplace Entrepreneur
Black History Matters 365
Black History Month 2021: A Reading from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Letter from A Birmingham Jail with Carl Jones, Voiceover Actor
Chapters
Black History Matters 365
Black History Month 2021: A Reading from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Letter from A Birmingham Jail with Carl Jones, Voiceover Actor
Feb 25, 2021
BHM365 is a weekly podcast series hosted by Jo Scaife a Marketplace Entrepreneur

A Reading of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. -  Letter from a Birmingham Jail

Join us every Thursday of this Black History month to capture readings from the famous letter from Birmingham jail. Carl Jones, voiceover actor will be reading portions of the passionate letter that helps us to see the importance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s message and impact. So much of what he states in this letter is applicable for today as we wrestle again with the fight against racial injustice, Dr. King and his associates had some major approaches that we today can learn from and solve many issues that have already been faced before. We celebrate Dr. King and his legacy with his own words read aloud to be remember for years to come.
 
The Words of Dr. Martin Luther King,  Jr:

"One of the basic points in your statement is that the action that I and my associates have taken in Birmingham is untimely. Some have asked: "Why didn't you give the new city administration time to act?" The only answer that I can give to this query is that the new Birmingham administration must be prodded about as much as the outgoing one, before it will act. We are sadly mistaken if we feel that the election of Albert Boutwell as mayor will bring the millennium to Birmingham. While Mr. Boutwell is a much more gentle person than Mr. Connor, they are both segregationists, dedicated to maintenance of the status quo. I have hope that Mr. Boutwell will be reasonable enough to see the futility of massive resistance to desegregation. But he will not see this without pressure from devotees of civil rights. My friends, I must say to you that we have not made a single gain in civil rights without determined legal and nonviolent pressure. Lamentably, it is an historical fact that privileged groups seldom give up their privileges voluntarily. Individuals may see the moral light and voluntarily give up their unjust posture; but, as Reinhold Niebuhr has reminded us, groups tend to be more immoral than individuals.

We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was "well timed" in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word "Wait!" It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This "Wait" has almost always meant "Never." We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that "justice too long delayed is justice denied."



Taken from full text from a "Letter from a Birmingham Jail: by Martin Luther King, Jr.


Episodes Edited by: Juels N. Evans, Tech Engineer Editor

Podcast music: Soundstrips.com, Title-Bitz

*This is apart of BH365 Education posted for the public.

Show Notes

A Reading of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. -  Letter from a Birmingham Jail

Join us every Thursday of this Black History month to capture readings from the famous letter from Birmingham jail. Carl Jones, voiceover actor will be reading portions of the passionate letter that helps us to see the importance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s message and impact. So much of what he states in this letter is applicable for today as we wrestle again with the fight against racial injustice, Dr. King and his associates had some major approaches that we today can learn from and solve many issues that have already been faced before. We celebrate Dr. King and his legacy with his own words read aloud to be remember for years to come.
 
The Words of Dr. Martin Luther King,  Jr:

"One of the basic points in your statement is that the action that I and my associates have taken in Birmingham is untimely. Some have asked: "Why didn't you give the new city administration time to act?" The only answer that I can give to this query is that the new Birmingham administration must be prodded about as much as the outgoing one, before it will act. We are sadly mistaken if we feel that the election of Albert Boutwell as mayor will bring the millennium to Birmingham. While Mr. Boutwell is a much more gentle person than Mr. Connor, they are both segregationists, dedicated to maintenance of the status quo. I have hope that Mr. Boutwell will be reasonable enough to see the futility of massive resistance to desegregation. But he will not see this without pressure from devotees of civil rights. My friends, I must say to you that we have not made a single gain in civil rights without determined legal and nonviolent pressure. Lamentably, it is an historical fact that privileged groups seldom give up their privileges voluntarily. Individuals may see the moral light and voluntarily give up their unjust posture; but, as Reinhold Niebuhr has reminded us, groups tend to be more immoral than individuals.

We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was "well timed" in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word "Wait!" It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This "Wait" has almost always meant "Never." We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that "justice too long delayed is justice denied."



Taken from full text from a "Letter from a Birmingham Jail: by Martin Luther King, Jr.


Episodes Edited by: Juels N. Evans, Tech Engineer Editor

Podcast music: Soundstrips.com, Title-Bitz

*This is apart of BH365 Education posted for the public.